The word curriculum manifests itself in many forms, and people bounce the word about in today’s education realms as if it had multiple definitions. Merriam-Webster defines curriculum as, “Curriculum is from New Latin (a post-medieval form of Latin used mainly in churches and schools and for scientific coinages), in which language it means “a course of study.” It shares its ultimate root in classical Latin, where it meant “running” or “course” (as in “race course”), with words such as corridorcourier, and currency, all of which come from Latin currere “to run.”

As educators, we are keenly aware that this definition does not fit many schools. We now have…

  • Standards-based curriculum…
  • Written Curriculum…
  • Taught Curriculum. …
  • Supported Curriculum. …
  • Assessed Curriculum. …
  • Recommended Curriculum. …
  • Hidden Curriculum. …
  • Excluded Curriculum. …
  • Learned Curriculum….
  • Faith-Infused Curriculum

Is each of these curriculums a separate race to run? How do we traverse and choose the pathway that is correct for our school and students? Over the next several months, we will explore these pathways and look at the pros and cons of each race. We will uncover the questions concerning a pure curriculum and a hybrid curriculum. So, let us start with some basic questions to ponder.

  • Who determines the curriculum for your school?
  • What expertise do the decision-makers have concerning the curriculum?
  • Is there a method used to determine curriculum?
  • What stakeholders are part of curriculum development?
  • How often is your curriculum revised?
  • Is your curriculum a shelf or file document?
  • How do you make your chosen curriculum come to life?

Start to ponder these questions as we start on our journey to a deeper understanding and engagement in the curriculum development process. The road ahead is exciting, so jump on the track and let’s start the ride.

Citation
https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/curriculum

A native of New Jersey, Dr. Majeski moved to Florida in 2014. Currently, Dr. Mark (as people call him) is the Associate Superintendent of Schools for the Diocese of St. Petersburg. He has spent the last 40+ years in education in many capacities. He has taught kindergarten grade through university students, worked as a principal, district administrator, and provided professional development on a local, regional, and national level. In addition to his love of education he has also been a music director in Catholic churches since he was 17 years old. Dr. Majeski holds a B.A. from Montclair State University, MMEd from Westminster Choir College – Rider University, MA from Kean University, and an Ed.D from The University of Nebraska – Lincoln. He and his wife Tricia have three children, and two granddaughters.

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